MDOP Smoothes Path For Windows 7 Deployment - InformationWeek

InformationWeek is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

IoT
IoT
IT Leadership // CIO Insights & Innovation
Commentary
9/18/2009
09:07 AM
Alexander Wolfe
Alexander Wolfe
Commentary
Connect Directly
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

MDOP Smoothes Path For Windows 7 Deployment

Microsoft is firing on all marketing guns as it moves to create an adoption groundswell for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. For enterprise users, another key piece of the ecosystem is about to fall into place. That would be the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) 2009 R2, a multi-tentacled toolkit containing virtualization technologies and a bunch of management tools.

Microsoft is firing on all marketing guns as it moves to create an adoption groundswell for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2. For enterprise users, another key piece of the ecosystem is about to fall into place. That would be the Microsoft Desktop Optimization Pack (MDOP) 2009 R2, a multi-tentacled toolkit containing virtualization technologies and a bunch of management tools.The new Windows 7-oriented iteration of MDOP will be released in late October. As a policy/management umbrella, it's got a laundry list of tools, including -- get ready for the acronyms - Advanced Group Policy Management (AGPM) 4.0; Diagnostics and Recovery Toolset (DaRT) 6.5; Desktop Error Monitoring (DEM) 3.5; and Asset Inventory Service (AIS).

But for me, there are clearly two capabilities which stand out in terms of importance, and could tip the balance for enterprises sitting on the upgrading fence. The first enables the create of a single OS image, so admins don't have to inventory hundreds of different configurations for their different users. According to Microsoft's typical naming conventions, you'd think this'd be called something like Unified Image Maintenance Management Tool (UIMMMMMMT) 6.7.8.5.1a. But you'd be wrong!

This highly useful feature falls under MDOP's Application Virtualization (App-V) heading. As described over on Technet, on Microsoft's Official MDOP blog, App-V lets you "reduce your base image footprint and new PC provisioning time - separate your applications from the base image, and minimize the number of applications installed after the image is deployed."

The ability to maintain a single OS image is a big part of the total cost of ownership (TCO) argument for Windows 7, and in subsequent posts I'll be looking at some of the adoption case studies Microsoft is releasing to support its case.

Windows XP Apps

The second key MDOP feature recognizes the reality that many enterprises skipped the Vista update cycle, and rely for their businesses Windows XP applications. The feature is called Enterprise Desktop Virtualization, or MED-V (that "M" must stand for Microsoft). The boilerplate for the MDOP blog says MED-V "will enable you to run applications that are not yet supported or tested on Windows 7, in a virtual Windows XP environment."

This is key because, while out-of-the-box applications compatibility with Windows 7 is a lot further along today than it was at a comparable period in Vista's life cycle, there are still a lot of apps -- particularly vertical ones -- which are still in the process of being ported over. MED-V removes that worry entirely.

To learn more about MDOP, and to check out more about the diagnostics and error-reporting features which I've given short shrift in this post, check out Technet's MDOP page, here.

For further reading, here's my article, Wolfe's Den: Windows 7 Deep Dive.




Windows 7 screen shot (Click for larger image and for full photo gallery.)




Microsoft slides spotlight the tech features of Windows 7. (Click to enlarge, and to see more PowerPoints.)


Follow me on Twitter: (@awolfe58)

What's your take? Let me know, by leaving a comment below or e-mailing me directly at [email protected]. Like this blog? Subscribe to its RSS feed: (here)

 My videos on ( YouTube)

 Facebook 

  LinkedIn

Alex Wolfe is editor-in-chief of InformationWeek.com.

We welcome your comments on this topic on our social media channels, or [contact us directly] with questions about the site.
Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Slideshows
IT Careers: Top 10 US Cities for Tech Jobs
Cynthia Harvey, Freelance Journalist, InformationWeek,  1/14/2020
Commentary
Predictions for Cloud Computing in 2020
James Kobielus, Research Director, Futurum,  1/9/2020
News
What's Next: AI and Data Trends for 2020 and Beyond
Jessica Davis, Senior Editor, Enterprise Apps,  12/30/2019
White Papers
Register for InformationWeek Newsletters
Video
Current Issue
The Cloud Gets Ready for the 20's
This IT Trend Report explores how cloud computing is being shaped for the next phase in its maturation. It will help enterprise IT decision makers and business leaders understand some of the key trends reflected emerging cloud concepts and technologies, and in enterprise cloud usage patterns. Get it today!
Slideshows
Flash Poll